COSI Blog

COSI Insider

12
June
2013

The Universe in a Glass of Ice Water

Ah, summertime! Warm weather, sunny days, and glasses of ice water on the table – er, I mean, the coaster, Mom. Really! Those crystalline cubes clinking against the glass, cooling all they touch and slowly, slowly disappearing into the background.

Incredibly, the science of ice water has a lot in common with the science of stars, including our own warmth-providing star the Sun. Let's look a little more deeply....
A photo of ice in water.
22
May
2013

Refreshing little kidspace®

The Early Childhood Education team at COSI continues to move forward in developing plans to renovate and update little kidspace®, our 11,000+ square foot permanent exhibition dedicated to young children and their families. We are excited to announce the next phase of renovation will be implemented this September during our annual shutdown period!
21
May
2013

The Official Bug of the COSI Team Garden

Have you ever looked out the second floor windows near Galleries 2 & 3 and wondered what was going on with all the plants on the rooftop below? If so, you were looking at COSI's Team Garden. For the past three years COSI Team Members have been able to sign up for a plot and create their very own rooftop container garden. Now that the weather has warmed up, the Team Garden is starting to take shape. It is awesome to be able to take a break from a busy day and get my hands dirty tending my vegetable plants.

This week an exciting event occurred in the Team Garden. A praying mantis egg case hatched, releasing scores of tiny mantids to patrol the plants in search for food.
Photo of mantids in the COSI Team Garden.
16
May
2013

3D Printer at COSI

Today we got COSI's first MakerBot Replicator 2 3D Printer! COSI's Electronic Engineer, Mike Schoenborn, and I were the lucky ones who got to start it up - much easier than I expected. We've already printed our first test object, "Mr. Jaws."
Photo of COSI's 3D printer COSI MakerBot.
07
May
2013

Flash!

Just over three and a half billion years ago, in the direction of the constellation Leo the Lion, something big happened – something very, very big. That very big something caused a beam of intensely energetic (yet invisible) light to fly our way. It's been traveling toward us all this time, as our Earth evolved and changed, until finally, on April 27, 2013, it reached our planet.

On that date, astronomers operating telescopes in orbit around the Earth recorded the most powerful gamma ray burst they'd seen in decades. Now those same astronomers are anxiously watching the same patch of sky for what they believe must follow, a giant stellar explosion called a supernova. If they can spot it, they will learn much about stars, their moments of death, and the origin of us all.

So what's the big deal about gamma rays?
Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration
<<  18 19 20 21 22 [2324 25 26  >>  

Blog Authors